Sunday, July 1, 2012

The Daily 5 - Chapter 1: Introduction!

Hello!

I am Abby from Third Grade Bookworm and I could not be more excited to kick off our summer book study with you!


I am a 3rd grade teacher in Georgia. My school is departmentalized 1st-5th, so I teach Reader's Workshop, Writer's Workshop and Skills Block (ELA) to 2 groups of students each day. On a *perfect* day, I get about 2 hours and 15 minutes with each group. That means no fire drills, or assemblies, field trips, IEP meetings... :)

Having taught at an America's Choice school for 10 years, I have been seriously invested in the workshop model.  That being said, I found myself really interested in the CAFE/Daily 5 model when our fabulous literacy coach brought it up this year. I read both books but didn't have time to really "digest" or put into action all of the fabulous things I learned.

So, when I started reading The Daily 5 again , I found myself saying - "Oh! Me too!" over and over during Chapter 1 when The Sisters wrote about all of the "things" they found themselves doing after school once the kids left... restocking centers, grading an assortment of "busywork" papers, assessing reading and writing tasks, etc.. I've often found myself looking up at the clock around 4:00 every afternoon, only to realize I haven't started to make my mini-lesson charts or prepare for my small groups and conferences for the next day. Then, I came across this question:

"Did those things just keep our kids busy, or were they engaged in literacy tasks that will make a difference in their literate lives?" (p. 4)

I had to be honest with myself. Many of the things my kids were doing quickly found their way into the recycle box! :) They were activities that aligned with the standards we were working on but they weren't meaningful activities that made my students better readers and writers. 

I also appreciated The Sisters' honesty in noting that during the first few weeks of school, their literacy instruction is focused on putting rituals and routines in place, setting expectations and building students' stamina for working and learning. I do have that fear of the Curriculum Cops coming by and wondering why I haven't started addressing the standards yet, but I'm prepared! 

"The way teachers structure their learning environment and the way students spend their time influences the level of reading proficiency the students have attained at the end of the year." (p.7)

In other words -  if we don't take time to establish the structure and expectations of our literacy block, our students will not be able to meet their potential as readers and writers during their year with us. Take that, Curriculum Cops! :)

As I try to reconcile the workshop model and Daily 5, I have a couple of questions I want to leave you with:

  • How does your current time for teaching literacy compare with what The Sisters suggest for The Daily 5? Is it longer? Shorter? Are you open to making an adjustment? Do you have a "block" of time you can set aside?
  • With intermediate students, our schedules are often more constrained than those of our primary counterparts. Are there pieces of The Daily 5 you would consider more "essential" than others? For example, would you consider Listen to Reading an essential component? 

Finally, I wanted to challenge you to take a look at your own management techniques and start to plan for those "tweaks" we all make every year. Think about how The Daily 5 will change the structure of your classroom environment. What will you keep? Throw out? Tweak?

I'm including a printable freebie that mirrors the chart The Sisters developed on pages 7-9. The first page is the one I'll be using. I pulled out the pieces I wanted to focus on the most. The second page is blank so that you can focus on what fits you and your classroom.



Management Evolution





I can't wait to hear what everyone has to say! Happy Reading!
Abby

182 comments:

  1. I started using the daily 5 half way through the year with my kindergarten class last year. I know this is for higher elemtary classes but I don't k ow what I am teaching next year.
    My kids loved it. When we didn't do it they asked me
    When we were going
    To
    Do the daily five. I will definently use the first few weeks to get the rituals and routines down. That was my biggest problem. I felt rushed starting at in the middle if the year. But my readers flourished.

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  2. I started using the daily 5 half way through the year with my kindergarten class last year. I know this is for higher elemtary classes but I don't k ow what I am teaching next year.
    My kids loved it. When we didn't do it they asked me
    When we were going
    To
    Do the daily five. I will definently use the first few weeks to get the rituals and routines down. That was my biggest problem. I felt rushed starting at in the middle if the year. But my readers flourished.

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  3. I teach third grade ELA. I taught 2 blocks last year, but will be teaching 3 blocks this year. I am worried about time and the Common Core (which is to be implemented this year). How do you fit it all in????? Including language, writing, etc......

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  4. I teach third grade all subjects. I have to fit in math, science, social studies and writing/grammar. The daily five has to become the daily three in my room and many of my reading lessons have to include my other subjects. I also have a reading anthology to incor porate in the mix. My 3 become read to self --need more intentional instruction, word work-- I like the choice system, and writing work --this area needs much more consistency and intentional instruction. My goal is to work on these three this year.

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  5. I teach 4th grade reading and writing and 5th grade social studies. Our reading time is is cut into different time blocks - sometimes we have 40 minutes, sometimes 30, and sometimes 20 - depending on the day. Therefore it's difficult to get a regular schedule going. We've adopted a new reading program called Making Meaning, which has a workshop approach. My goal is to really focus on read to self - using CAFE strategies, listening to reading, and word work/work on writing as a combo. Because our times are so varied, I think the kids will be required to work through a cycle of choices every week. I don't believe there's enough scheduled time in any one day for them to be able to complete more than one or two activities in a meaningful way. I am excited to really link the reading and writing.

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  6. Does anyone have a schedule that they use for teaching ELA blocks using Daily 5? I would love to see how someone else works around the time constraints. Thanks :) email: gumbie96@yahoo.com

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  7. I teach 4th self contained and we always have at least a 2 hour block for ELA. I plan to use Daily 5/ CAFE exclusively this year. We are getting a new principal and she loves these ideas, so I won't have to worry about the Curriculum Cops, during those first few weeks. The routines and procedures have been my weakest area in the past, because I felt that they should have learned quickly and I didn't spend enough time on them, that will be different this year.

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    1. This will be my 1st time being self contained 4th grade. I'm nervous & you excited all at the same time! I, too, plan to have a 2-hour literacy block. My concern is grades. We have to have grades for the progress report that goes home 4in 1/2 weeks after school starts. I feel like that's why I've been weak in the procedures/ routines. Any suggestions?

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  8. I am going to start my first year teaching (yay!!) in a 4th grade ELA/SS class, two blocks a day. I have a specific curriculum that I am supposed to follow in addition to small groups, so while I am in love the the idea of Daily 5/CAFE, I'm not sure there's enough time in my blocks to get through it in addition to the set curriculum. I would like to try to implement a Daily 3 system, but students (and me!) would have to finish the core curriculum lesson before getting to it.

    If anyone has any suggestions on making the Daily 5(3)/CAFE work with district mandated curriculum, I'd love to hear them!

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  9. I teach fourth grade, and I can completely relate to the sisters before scenario. I know that I am not teaching authentic literature, but I didn't know a better way. This way makes sense. I have a principal who will support me as long as my test scores show positive growth. I believe that the daily 5 will help. My biggest downfall before was not spending enough time on practice. That is one area I will need to focus on. Also I love the idea of building stamina. That has been one of my missing pieces. I am so excited to implement this system.

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  10. I teach 4th grade self contained. I am interested in Daily 5 which is why I am reading the book this summer, and glad to see this book study! I do believe in order for children to become better readers, they MUST have time to read which is what Daily 5 does. I read a book a few years ago called R5. The premis behind it is the same as Daily 5 which is read, read, read and confer with students. The thing I like about Daily 5 is that it creates a visual of the strategies introduced so that teachers and students can refer back to those as needed. While I am hoping to implement some or majority of Daily 5 system, I have learned that a committee of teachers met this summer and planned out what we have to teach in Reading, how long we have to teach that strategy/skill and when it has to be taught. To me this goes against everything we know about differentiated teaching since we need to adapt what we are teaching to what our current students' needs are. That may and usually does differ from year to year. My concern is will this plan allow me to spend time teaching routines and procedures at the beginning of the year, let alone allow me to use Daily 5? I am also interested in hearing how/if Daily 5 works with a mandated curriculum!

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  11. I teach third grade at a brand new school. Our focus will be on project based learning. I like how the Daily 5 has the students actively engaged, and plan on implementing it with the new curriculum. Does anyone else use the Daily 5 at a PBL school?

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  12. I am a 5th grade teacher. I am interested in Daily 5/Cafe because my school system is implementing this for next school year. I read the graphic organizer at the end of chapter 1 and was blown away by how much time was spent in Daily 5. I wish I had that much time that I could devote to ELA. So 2+ hours daily is a bit unrealistic for me. I do have a 90 minute block so I think I could fit parts of Daily 5 into that time period. I think the essential parts of Daily 5 are Read to Self, Word Work, Work on Writing. I would also like to incorporate Listen to someone read, but I don't if I will have time on a daily basis. I would love to hear from others who have implemented this in the upper grades to get their ideas and tips on Daily 5.

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  13. I am a 6th Grade teacher. I started using Daily 5 3 years ago in 4th Grade being Self - Contained. I then moved to 4th Grade Reading/Writing/SS and last year and this coming year I am doing 6th Grade Reading/Writing/SS. I have joined this book study as a way to refresh and rethink, but maybe I can help in some ways too.

    My rethinks:
    1) I need to teach the procedures, rules, guidelines and practice them completely before I let the kids go.
    2) Choice is part of the options
    3) Part of the Daily 5 is the students being responsible for their own behaviors, not me being the behavior police (that's hard for me to break)

    How I have done thing -

    I have never done a true daily 5 due to time constraints and the age of my kids. I have always done Read to Self and Work On writing. I have also tried to incorporate Read to Someone. The two sisters will tell you that Read to Self is a MUST!!! This is where they grow. I added Read to Someone because a) they like it and b) with as many different levels in my classroom, the ability for each student to learn from another comes in handy.

    For the last 2 years, I have had about 2 hours to complete REading/Writing/SS (much less time than the 2 sisters recommend) plus my lessons were hard to teach in that 5-7 minute mini lesson. Here is how I did my blocks.

    1 - I tried for 2-3 10-15 minute Mini Lessons (usually 1 comprehension with a Picture book, 1 Writing, and 1 reading/SS for non fiction strategies)
    2- Their Daily 5 (independent) activity was between 20-30 minutes long.
    3- Your mandated curriculum, common core, or TEKS as we call them in Texas are taught during the mini lessons. Those are your strategies or skills.
    4 - While the students are doing their Daily 5, you are pulling your small groups, or individual conference, and this is where your differentiation comes in.

    I know for us upper teachers this system seems confusing the first time you go through it. It did for me as well. The first time I read Daily 5, I thought - Wow this is great but how am I going to do this, and this, and this. Then I read CAFE (The second part of this book study) and I went AH HA, that is how. Believe me it all comes together when you have read both books. Cafe will also connect to a lot of the mandated, Common Core, or TEKS requirements. Happy Reading. Hope this helps, and Can't Wait for Chapter 2.

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  14. Julie, remember Daily 5 is the structure under which you can teach your curriculum!
    I do Daily 3 most days. Some days Daily 2.
    Bev, my district is doing the same thing.I have concerns about the pacing too.
    The purpose is to keep our more transient students in a common thread of instruction. Which is hard to rectify with what is best for my own classroom.
    Checkout 4321teach@blogspot.com for additional thoughts from myself and my coblogger.

    EmilyK

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    1. I agree Emily, I think you need to make the Daily 5 your own to be successful. Allowing yourself to do the Daily 3 or Daily 2 allows you to make it work with all of the other requirements teachers have every day. I am using the concept as a framework for my classroom and then tweaking it so it works for us! Teachers should not be discouraged if they don't think they can do all 5 components right away.

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  15. I am a recovering Kindergarten teacher. I moved up to 4th Grade two years ago. I'm interested in Daily 5 but wonder what it will look like in upper grades. I have the same concerns that others have posted about the word work and other activities for upper grades. I also have concerns about shared reading with 31 students in a physically very small classroom.

    I am concerned about the management issue. Our school adopted a 1:1 iPads for grades 4-6. Last year our grade level participated in the pilot program. Next year we roll out remaining grades. It's just a lot to manage and account for. I'm curious if anyone else out there is working in this environment?

    I plan to implement Reader's Workshop/Notebook next year in my classroom. I have ordered Notebook Connections (Bruckner) and Strategies that Work (Harvey) and I am excited about the notebook idea. So many great ideas out there. I am eagerly awaiting the arrival my Amazon order! Does anyone have experience with digital reader's notebooks?

    I am excited, my husband says I'm obsessed), about implementing next year.

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  16. I agree, Nichole. Once you read both books, it all comes together. I don't think of Daily 5 as a curriculum. Rather it's a method. I'm sure we've all asked ourselves when we first started implementing guided reading groups, "So what are all the other kids doing?" Daily 5 is what the other kids are doing. But the actual tasks they do during that time is what you decide according to your curriculum. So, if part of your writing curriculum calls for word choice, for example, then that is what the students work on during Work on Writing. Of course, you've already had that mini lesson the day before. I'm no expert in this. In fact, I've never called what I do in my classroom "the Daily 5". We've mostly been trying to come up with meaningful workstations and at the end of last year they became very similar to a Daily 3!! So that's why I'm here. To see how we can get closer to this model and get some tips. I think we're getting there!

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  17. Sarah, Yes, I too love the idea that the kids are self monitoring but wonder if I can truly establish the norm in my classroom and eliminate myself as the policeman. I hate having to interrupt conferences to discipline off task students. I've been researching behavior programs. Came across a punch card system that rewards those who's clips move up and stay up. I've also considered introducing a classroom economy? I liked the "warm fuzzies" in conjunction with "fill your bucket" but I am concerned this is a bit too primary for 4th Grade? I have not settled on a program yet. Would be curious to know what has worked for others.

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    1. I've used ClassDojo for my 4th graders and they love it, as do parents because I can send home personalize behavior reports via email daily or weekly. The kiddos get to customize their own "monster" now so I am really excited to use this feature next year!

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    2. Mrs. K, I just found ClassDojo and am considering using it this year. Is it easy to implement with Daily 5 program?

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  18. Sandra - I did the warm fuzzies for table points in the 4th grade class I student taught in. The kids loved it and were really encouraged to be on their best behavior since they could see their progress. They also loved comparing and counting them over and over again to see how well they were doing. :)

    Nicole - I'm also in Texas and am required to follow TEKS by using the district's pacing guide and lessons. It is a bit confusing and maybe a wee bit overwhelming (trying to find time for it all), but I'm excited for it all to snap into place and hopefully make it work for my room.

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  19. I am a 5th grade teacher in Virginia. We began the Daily 5/CAFE last year, and I think it was fairly successful. Even though we just did Work on Writing, Read to Self, and Word Work. We thought those would be the most helpful to the students. However, after reading the first chapter, I find that many students need to be read to so they can hear the unfamiliar words. Not only do they need to hear those words, I think having them read to each other will also help their fluency. Because we assess the students in their fluency, I think read to each other would greatly benefit the students.

    Boushey and Moser suggest spending 2 hours on the Daily 5. Initially, I thought that would be impossible. We rearranged our schedule so we would have a dedicated 30-minute writing block in the morning. In the afternoon, we have a 70-minute block we were did our other two sessions. I think getting the students to understand the desired behaviors and expectations is paramount to the success Daily 5.

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  20. I currently teach fourth grade, and I am so excited to try the Daily 5 this upcoming year. I have never heard of it before this year. It is exactly what I have been looking for. I can totally relate to the sisters before description of their classrooms. That is me! I know that my teaching is not as effective as it could be. I struggle with the test prep instruction I am told to use and reading the authentic way I believe in. I feel that this method will offer me the high test scores I need to justify my style. I like the idea of teaching stamina. That is one area that I have definitely been weak. Also I know that I need to revisit teaching expectations, so that the students can master them. Finally, I need to work really hard on letting the students manage their own behavior. I know that I often get in the way. That may be the hardest part for me this upcoming year. I am excited for the challenge.

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  22. This is my 2nd year teacher and I read both books and really loved the ideas and the arrangement. I teach self-contained 4th grade and I have a 90 minute Reading block and then 45 minutes for writing back to back and I plan on utilizing that time to dedicate it to CAFE and Daily 5. Even though this was my first year teaching I was able to relate to being the last one in my classroom and staring at the parking lot with no cars and wondering where did everyone go?? :) I truly want to take the time to enforce the routines the first twenty days that is something I didnt really do because I thought that since the kids were older they didnt need so much practice but I was nieve in that thinking and this year I will be dedicated to really getting those routines down pat.
    I am concerned with time management and finding word work that is more meaningful for 4th grade especially since our writing test is big on spelling and grammer.

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    1. I was thinking about using Words Their Way for my word work in the Daily 5 structure. It seems like a perfect fit in terms of meaningful learning within a time constraint.

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  24. Thanks for the feedback on "warm fuzzies." Great idea for table points.

    Are there any other National Board teachers out there? This is reminds me of what we learned through the process. Loving it!

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    1. Yes Sandra I am a NBCT and I agree it does mirror parts of the process which is affirming. I will be renewing my certification this fall and I am excited to use "The Sisters'" ideas as the framework of my classroom.

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  25. I teach 4th and started D5 last November. After I introduced them all, I mainly only had time for 2 blocks of choices during the day, and I had to shorten them up to only 1/2 hour each. I'm excited to start it at the beginning of the year this time around. We have OCR so it was a juggle of getting the longer stories into the day. It worked doing an hour of D5 before lunch, and the other hour after lunch.

    What I found for me last year was definitely doing the mini/focus lessons to break up the transitions. I still did 4 mini lessons a day in the different areas. I just kept 2 blocks for us all to do the activity together (story lesson and read to self.) The other blocks I let them choose to continue writing, read to someone, read to self, listen to reading (which I use mp3 players and computers), and word work. When they were making their choices I did intervention activities with specific students. It worked once I stopped stressing about it so much. =)

    Emily

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    1. Emily, would mind providing a breakdown of your schedule? I find this is the one major issue I'm grappling with.

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  26. It's great to read how you all schedule your Daily 5 time. I'm definitely looking at how to incorporate Daily 5 and Reader's and Writer's Workshop.

    I've been teaching 5th grade math and science, but am moving to 4th grade self-contained in a new school. I'll have to learn how they "do" reading and writing there. I'm so big on routine that I really want to have the same thing everyday, not Daily 2 one day and Daily 4 the next.

    Does anyone use literacy stations?

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  27. I teach a 5th grade self-contained, and have a 90 minute block for reading, plus a basal anthology we are to use. I had used a workshop approach, but felt like the intentional teaching of lessons was what was missing, and why Daily 5 appeals to me. I keep a separate writing workshop, but use "writing about reading" in our reader's notebooks as my work on writing.

    I have read the books before and tried a few things out, but got frustrated with trying to make it fit and the lack of time--and seeing their flow chart reminded me why it felt that way! I wish I had that amount of time. The sisters themselves actually say a Daily 2 or Daily 3 for intermediate grades in their workshops, which gives me hope that I can make it all fit, and then add the other choices as interventions or with specific students.

    One of my favorite things about Daily 5 has been how the kids DO take over self-monitoring and actually staying on task. The teaching of expectations, slowly and thoughtfully, and teaching stamina, have been the parts that most impacted me when I started.

    I also have 9 iPods in my classroom, and am looking for ways to use those as a choice within Daily 5 for meaningful practice (maybe fluency?)

    Melinda

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    1. I plan in using my iPads for fluency practice as well as listen to reading. There are so many great apps out there for audiobooks.

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  28. @Melinda--that's great to have so many iPods! Fluency would be a great way to use them. You can also have dyslexic students and struggling readers listen to the book as they read along, then go back and reread themselves.
    The Science Penguin

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  29. Sandra, I have thought about using a class blog for some of my "notebooking" or responding to books digitally, allowing the kids to then read and respond to each other as well. I would love to hear if anyone else has tried it!

    Melinda

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  30. I have had a listening center in my 4th grade classroom for the past two years, and I definitely wouldn't pull that out of the program! If anything, I feel like it can replace a good part of "Read to Someone" because it teaches fluency and expression. On the other hand, it doesn't coach the child to use reading strategies when they come to an unknown word...

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  31. I teach 4th and 5th special education in Georgia. I am really excited about trying D5 this year. I am concerned about implementing it and common core at the same time. We were given a unit by the state that we are required to follow. My biggest concern is that by following that unit my special needs students are doing the same assignments as the gifted students. What happened to differentiation? I am trying to figure out how to implement the D5 and still cover what I have to on the unit.

    I think I am going to have to drop the listen to reading, (because I feel I model that a lot any way throughout the day), focus on read to self, read to someone, word work, work on writing. I think my one of my mini lessons will focus on the unit requirements. I am hoping I can make it all work.

    Question: When do you fit in Language/Grammar? My students really need the word work to focus on fluency and spelling and general decoding skills. Would you fit it in with the work on writing?

    Is anyone else required to follow a specific unit or plan?

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  32. I have a 75 minute block. I think we are only going to have time for 2 twenty minute rotations with 2 mini-lessons in between.

    I teach at a project based learning school and we teach reading based on units or genres (poetry, mystery, journalism, historical fiction, greek myths are what I am teaching this year) I'm thinking I will teach this during some of my small groups and mini-lessons, but all of the other kids will be putting on plays and puppet shows and poetry cafe's. When will my kids have time to do this? Does it matter?
    Adventures in Room 5

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  33. I will be teaching ELA to three sections of fourth graders this year. I will only have about 90 minutes for each class. I believe I will have time for only a Daily 2 or 3. I will probably choose read to self, writing, and word study...but would love to incorporate listening and speaking somehow. I am anxious to hear from others with similar situations as to how they will address their time constraints. I do believe procedures and behaviors need to be taught, modeled, and practiced for many days at the beginning of the year, after Christmas break, and again after Easter break to establish and maintain a learning environment with student self-managing behaviors:)

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  34. I will be teaching 3rd grade self-contained next year. Like Sarah, my school is strongly focused on PBL. I can be flexible with my time for reading block and I am excited about trying Daily 5. Abby, I can relate to your concerns about making every minute of your reading block meaningful. I've felt like the main thing that was missing in my class was time for students to actually read, and it looks like Daily 5 is strongly focused on providing that time.

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  35. Wendy, I think your comment about revisiting procedures and behaviors after the long break is excellent. I am a 5th Grade teacher that always assumes the intermediate students need only a quick review and reminder of policies and procedures and we're all on our way. Of, course, it never works.

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  37. I've used blogging in science...now that I'll be teaching reading, I'm planning to use it for Reader's Response. Here's a post about setting up a blog on Kid BLog.

    The Science Penguin

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  38. After reading comments:

    1. I believe I will go with Daily 2-3
    2. Perhaps to/with another could be an early finisher? I
    3. This summer I discovered CD's for our basal readers (houghton mifflin) in our curriculum storage area. I think I can upload them to iTunes and have the kids listen to them on their iPads? Great strategy for ELL's.
    4. I love the idea of being able to work with individuals/groups without interruptions. I found a great idea with punch cards/rewards and hope that will motivate.

    My Concerns:

    1. Will the self-accountability piece really fall into place? I hate being teacher cop and would truly LOVE to see this take place in my classroom. I'm trying to be mindful that it's usually just 1-3 kids who really have difficulty but the one can sometimes make independent work impossible. I had a wonderful student this year that I truly loved but was challenging. I really need to be more mindful of contracts and rewarding the students who are motivated and hard working. Whew! So much to think about!

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  39. I think the point about literacy activities being meaningful is so important. When I was trying to do a variety of literacy centers and activities, I felt like I was working so hard to create activities and differentiate instruction that I had little time for other planning. Even though I tried to make sure that my students had time for self-selected reading, there was so much activity in the room that it was hard for kids to concentrate. I ended up switching to a reading workshop model that I found to be very effective for reading instruction although it didn't incorporate spelling and writing. I'm interested to see how the Daily 5 compares with the reading workshop model.
    Laura Candler
    Teaching Resources Website
    Corkboard Connections Blog

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  40. Hate to even mention it, but what about grades?? We have to have 5 test/project grades and 6 class work grades by end of Oct. Any suggestions on how to take reading grades?

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  41. I am moving to the general education classroom after being in the special education classroom for five years, homeschooling and stay at home mom before that. I will teach 40 minute classes of 6, 7, 8 grade intervention reading. I don't really have a clue what I will do, but I saw this book group and thought it sounded interesting. I don't like playing teacher cop or busy work or hours of grading or planning. I taught a READ 180 program that I really liked; it is 90 minutes of computer program, independent reading, and teacher-led reading where the 3 groups rotated around. So far, I like the idea of Daily 5.

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  42. I'm self-contained 3rd grade and want to implement D5 next year. I'm at a title 1 school and most of my students have very little parent support with reading at home. The only reading they do is at school. I'm VERY concerned about fitting this into my schedule - I have 90 minutes for reading & writing. I also have to incorporate the required basal, Treasures. I'm excited to share ideas in this book study!

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  43. Any 4th grade Georgia teachers? Please reply to this post :)

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  44. The biggest concern I have with this is time. I really want to try this in my classroom, but trying to figure out how to make it all work, with the common core, and district requirements.

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  45. I use the Daily 5 mostly as center rotations because we do have a mandated curriculum...so it's not the 'true' model. Basically, my classroom centers are the Daily 5, but my students don't necessarily hit each one each day. Often they do each a few times per week, but how often also depends on my guided reading schedule. I have three rounds of guided reading during which I first meet with the students who need the most support, then this group meets with the reading teacher during round two, then they have round three for one of the five. I wish I knew of another way, but I'm not sure how to work it with our reading program:(

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  46. I found myself frustrated with my reading instruction this past year and felt like "The Sisters" said everything I felt. I taught 5th grade and had a 45 minute reading block. To answer a question in the blog post, I do feel at 5th grade a listening component is important and in my case, helped out my readers that were at a first and second grade level. I did allow students to self-select their own material at their level for Accelerated Reader purposes, but was frustrated with the basal material I was required to use.

    I enjoyed reading this book and look forward to putting it in action. My question is for other Daily 5 users, how do you incorporate your basal material into this structure? My school corporation was pretty clear for us to use our materials so I'm curious to see how the basal has been adapted to the Daily 5 for others. The other thing in the back of my mind is grading. How does this fit in?

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  47. I'm a 4th grade teacher at an independent private school I am totally new to the Daily 5 - always thought it was for the K-2 crowd. I REALLY appreciate all the wisdom being shared here. Like all, time is an issue. Last year I had about 70 minutes. I had great success with lit circles, and would like to make them work with the D5 - any suggestions/comments there are welcome. My school uses Wordly Wise, which I thought could be part of "spelling/word work" (I'm still shopping for a spelling program I like).

    It sounds like I am supposed to use my creativity to make the Wordly Wise (worksheet-a-palooza) fun and motivating so the management portion of D5 will be successful...does that sound right?

    Also, the notion of doing more than one mini-lesson a day seems daunting to me? Can any of you speak to that? My system was to do a comp/strategies lesson 3x a week and a spelling/vocab/grammar lesson 2x a week. We did "Writing Wednesdays" when we spent most of our CA block on writing, and kids would then take days to do the work we started then...make sense?

    Trish :)

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  48. I have used Daily 5 for 2 years now, but I feel like I am ready to push my students to the next level this coming year. I will be teaching a self-contained 4th grade. My teammates and I rearranged our schedule so that we have a solid 2 hours for literacy in which to do Daily 5. This will incorporate a whole class minilesson (shared reading) at the beginning and shorter (word work/writing) minilessons throughout the block.

    When I first started Daily 5, I was really worried about the management piece, as some people have talked about here. However, I trusted the ideas from the book and practiced, practiced, practiced! Even though it is time consuming at the beginning of the year to have kids try again and again to form the habits correctly, it is worth it in the long run. Once the students have formed the habits you want, the management almost takes care of itself. I'm not saying there aren't "flare ups" here and there, but most of their time is spent in meaningful work that furthers their abilities as readers and writers.

    I will also mention that this will be the first year that I will have more time for more rotations. My class has done a Daily 3 before, but this year I will be able to have time for a Daily 4 (or maybe even 5!). I have always taught Read to Self, Work on Writing, Read to Someone and Listen to Reading, but the students never were able to do every routine every day. I had to try to keep track of what they were doing each day. In the coming school year, I can't wait to focus on what I am doing with students, and making it more meaningful while the others are doing their Daily 5 routines!

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  49. I am a third grade teacher and have been using d5 for the last two years (My district adopted it as our reading structure). Many of the concerns that people have will not be much of a problem. Most days I fit in 3 mini lessons and 3 rotations. My students must do read to self and work on writing. The third is their choice. In the past we had Houghton Mifflin. I still use much of the program to guide my mini lessons. I also use my science and SS curriculum to teach nonfiction text. As for time, most rotations are 30 min but can easily be shortened when needed (my last one is often 15- 20 min.) This structure is very flexible and easy to use.

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  50. Amanda-Claire,

    At my last school, I taught 5th and we had Treasures, a decent program. I recall it was set up with all the D5 components. Is your basal like that? For instance, could you use the comp strategies in that week's part of the basal for your mini lessons, and then the writing/spelling/vocab components for the rest of D5 stuff?

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  51. Our district adopted Daily 5 as a reading structure, so the time should now be a problem. I can't really think of a component that shouldn't be in there, even for the older kids. I think that you just need to adapt. I plan on having the science and social study texts be a part of listen to reading (they are available on CDs) in order to better juggle use of time, and I think that it will help in meeting the Common Core.

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  52. Laura Candler, I have read your book on the reading workshop and implemented it a little last year. It worked well and the students loved being able to choose their own books. I think D5 and Reading Workshop will play off each other nicely. I think D5 takes reading workshop to the next level. What do you think?

    I am also concerned about grades. I am thinking I might have to implement more rubrics for my grades rather than actual paper pencil grades.

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  53. I teach 4th grade at a charter school. My principal gives us LOTS of liberty as far as teaching styles are concerned as long as the standards are being met; I am not forced to follow county pacing guides or even use the basal (which collects dust on a shelf). I co-teach and have approximately 40 students in my classroom, to say space is at a premium is an understatement, I am also limited to a 2 hour Reading/Writing block. This coming school year is a transition year for me into the Common Core with the following school year being a complete jump to Common Core (as part of the Common Core leadership team, I HAVE to be on top of it). I LOVE the idea of the Daily 5, but wonder how to implement it with so many students, in so little space, all the while implementing the Common Core, not to mention, when do we have time to read novels as a class (my favorite thing to do). AND what about that 10% to 20% of my class that are ELL Levels 1 & 2.

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  54. I too teach in GA and and concerened about the mandated CCGPS units that we must teach. I am moving to a new school to teach a 4th grade class. This is my second year of teaching. Last year I started in October and I was working with a co-teacher in an inclusion class which made it easier to break students up into reading and math groups. I am worried about how I am going to handle it all on my own this year. I am excited about learning more about the Daily 5/CAFE to see if I can incorporate any of the methods into my classroom.

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  55. I am taking on a 4th grade classroom in the fall for the first time. I haven't been shown what my classroom schedule will look like yet, but I will try to model my Daily 5 to be simlilar to the one that two of our first grade teachers have used in their classrooms. We'll see how much I will need to revamp things after I get my hands on scheduling. They used 2 rounds of D5 with 30 minutes each, but I'm hoping to be able to add another round. The reading specialists in our school will take some groups for each round. The first grade teachers then use a separate 30 minute time for working with the schoolwide reading material (Harcourt Trophies). I think the hardest part will be trying to figure out how to marry Daily 5 to our reading series. I know that a lot of extra reading time to the story can be used during read to self and read to someone and maybe even listen to reading, since these stories are on tape.
    I have just been impressed watching the first graders become so independent in their Daily 5 routines and seeing that there are many more opportunities for them to read during the school day than is given during normal reading groups.
    We'll see how things go. I appreciate this book club on Daily 5 and CAFE. It is really going to help me get my head on straight! :)

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  56. Hi Patricia!

    I used the Reading Street series, which is broken down into skills. Different skills and reading stratgies are rotated throughout the series with each story. Now reading through everyone's comments and your post, I can see how I could adapt the basal. I just hate those workbook pages! Unfortunately, our corporation chose not to use the writing component Reading Street offered and gave us something completely different to use, but if I put my mind to it, I could make it work. It sounds like this is a very flexible system that anyone can build to suit their needs.

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  57. I am looking forward to using the Daily 5 and CAFE model in my classroom this year. I read the books over spring break. I will have 120 minutes for my ELA block and our district is wanting us to integrate all subjects through our ELA and Math blocks. It will be interesting to see how this will all work together. I've also thought about using the Words Their Way program for the Word Work section.

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  58. I am so thankful to all for the opportunity to be involved in this summer- time personally directed PD.

    This past year I had about 90 min for literacy, I might be able to stretch that to 120 this coming year though perhaps not everyday.

    Read to yourself (everyday), read to someone (optional depends on student need), work on writing ( everyday), listen to reading(optional depends on student need), and spelling/word study (everyday).

    I've tried to use the Daily 5/CAFE system the past two years though it doesn't ever quite seem to blossom into full fruition.

    I do agree that we must spend the first weeks setting up routines and allow for our learners to steep in the new learning environments we are creating. I feel that this can be done while integrating curriculum into the mix.

    It is helpful that some of the learners do have experience with these ideas in the primary grades though they have not been consistently adopted.

    I too am concerned about our grades; Uses reading strategies, Develops vocabulary, Reads with understanding, Develops fluency, Uses phonics skills in addition to writing grades. Are there rubrics? Also we are transitioning to Common Core. Will I have time for language and grammar skills?

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  59. I am a Special Ed Literacy teacher for 6th-8th graders. I have used Daily 5/ Cafe for the past few years. It is so worth the practice of routines in the beginning of the school year. My room is the 'hub" of the school and when people come in and see 12 children engaged in learning and the class is pretty quiet they want to know the "secret." :) Management of time has proven to be an issue for me. We have 88 minute blocks and I am really going to have to stick to a time this year when I have 3 classes cycling through. I am also a lover of novel studies and try to do one per month with the kids. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. It's nice to have this forum along with a refresher of the Sisters...thank you. :)

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  60. I teach third grade, and we have just over two hours (usually) for language arts (reading, spelling, grammar, writing). I haven't yet done the daily 5 in my classroom, and I can totally relate to having way too much work to grade and spending a lot of time at work in the evenings and not getting everything I need accomplished.

    I really want to try daily 5 this year, but I do think it would be very difficult to squeeze everything in! Read to Self is one of the things I like most about the Daily 5 so I would love to do it every day! Listen to Reading and Read to Someone I would consider using one to two days a week, because I do still see them as important parts of learning to read and read well. My school has a basal (Scott Foresman Reading Street), and I'm also a little concerned about how to fit it and the daily 5 together.

    Melinda,

    I use iPods for fluency with my third graders. It works out great because I can listen to it later and work with a small group while their doing that. Some kids are more comfortable reading without me sitting right next to them too!

    Jackie

    Third Grade's A Charm

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  61. Mr. Biornstad...
    I like the idea of using some of the 5 only for certain students. Like listening to reading and reading to someone. I'd like to also use the SS text that is on CD for some of these students. Thanks for all the ideas, everyone!

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  62. @Mrs. K:
    I don't know if I'm the Emily you wanted the schedule from =)
    11:00 ELA starts (Math is before this point since the beginning of school, and afterwards is Social Studies or Science)
    11:00-11:10 Focus Lesson #1 (Comprehension focus - sometimes use the workbook from OCR)
    11:10-11:40 Whole class story lesson
    Monday - preview story and vocabulary
    Tuesday - read and discuss
    Wednesday - Read to Someone (whole class using story) and Listen to Reading (mp3 players when done)
    Thursday - Review story
    Friday - test time
    11:40-11:50 Focus#2 (Writing - one time a week I "make" the kids work on an assigned piece of work whole class during the block that they continue on the rest of the week, done by Friday so they can go to PAT)
    11:50-12:15 D5 choice time - I pull kids to work with
    12:15-12:55 lunch
    12:55-1:05 Read Aloud - takes place of Focus #3
    1:05-1:30 Read to Self whole class - I make notes of who is reading what, monitor AR tests, they tell me what book is about when done, etc.
    1:30-1:40 Focus #4 (something the whole class is struggling with/debrief of what they learned)
    1:40-2:00/2:10 D5 choice - I pull kids to work with

    Hope this helps.
    Emily
    www.ilovemyclassroom.blogspot.com

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  63. I love learning tidbits from everyone. I am moving from 17 years in 2nd grade to 4th grade this upcoming school year. Last year I fully intended to use Daily 5 with my 2nd graders. I made the signs and got my chart paper ready. Somehow the year progressed without the Daily 5 as I never found the time to focus on the program. I am excited about the opportunity to try again this year and start with a much deeper understanding of the Daily 5 (or 3) with my new challenges of 2 sets of 4th graders for L. ARts each day. Hopefully, by teaching only language arts I will be able to find the time to implement these wonderful ideas.

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  64. I have taught first grade for 11 years and wished I had this information then. My life would have been so much easier! This school year I will be teaching reading to 6th-8th graders and one class of 6th grade Language Arts. I am excited to implement the Daily 5 or as much as I can within a 50 minute block of time.

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  65. @ Sandra Chapman - I like the idea of your punch cards/rewards system. Would you be able to explain that? Thanks!

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  66. I have heard about D5/CAFE for several years now, but this year I'm actually reading the books for myself. I think the brilliance of D5 is that it is a guideline and we as teachers can bend it and mold it to make it work for our classrooms! I don't think this is the end all..be all for teaching reading. What it has done for me is made me question each and everything I ask my students to do. Is it really improving their reading and writing abilities? The only way to truly do that is to have students actually reading and writing. This is what D5 focuses on...real, engaged reading and writing. I don't really know how it's going to play out in my classroom yet, but I'm excited for this journey that I'm taking! And I'm glad there are other teachers who are taking it with me! I am unfortunately a "lone ranger" at my school, but it's great to find other teachers who are right there with me! Can't wait to hear what everyone thinks about the rest of the book!

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  67. Wow! I am returning to the classroom this August, 4th grade, I am really excited. I have spent most of my 11 years teaching in first and second grade. This book gets me really excited to teach reading. I am a big fan of reading and writing workshop, this seems to fit nicely together with the Daily 5.
    I agree with a couple of other folks mentioning the Daily 2 or 3, it seems like a large chunk of the day reading. It seems like you could be reading other subject areas during these blocks too? That would be fantastic!
    This is new to me and I really look forward to reading, discussing, and sharing with you all this summer!
    I really like the student-driven structure.

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  68. @Sandra Chapman Can you tell me how to upload my CDs from my reading series to iTunes? I have the CDs that go with my Scott Foresman series.

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  69. We have 140 minutes for literacy in our fourth grade. That is chunked into four distinct blocks to accommodate basic skills schedules, therefore, we are expected to be teaching guided reading, writing, whole group, and spelling/grammar at specific times. I am not certain how D5 will fit with this.

    I am leery of student selection. I am interested in reading more to see how this works. To me, things need to be structured such so students complete a full complent of activities.

    It seems plenty of the posters here have read ahead. :) Good to see the enthusiasm. BTW, I am reading the Kindle version of the book and note there are not page numbers associated with this title. I point that out just for reference. I am looking forward to reading along with everyone and discussing this book. Thanks for hosting us!

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  70. I understand the importance of the first 25 days, however, I am expected to start teaching the basal the third full week of school. This is essentially where our grades come from. How do you all manage the first 5 weeks and include reading grades in there. Please help.

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  71. WOW, I am anxiously overwhelmed but feel at ease knowing that Daily 5 is more simple than what I use to do, 6 years ago. I have been out of the classroom to be with my daughters for the past 6 years. Your feedback on the 5 choices and arrangement is very helpful. Also, I feel that once the routine is set in place that this will be alot easier than years ago when I stayed at school till 6 and then still felt overwhelmed with too much. Sometimes the less is better for all of us, especially for the true success of the students.

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  72. @Shaelynn Nordwald, uploading CDs to iTunes is simple. Open iTunes and insert the CD into your computer. The CD will "open" on iTunes. On my computer it imports automatically, if yours doesn't, click on the "Import CD" button on the bottom right hand side. Hope this helps.

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  73. @Shaelynn Nordwald - I also uploaded my reading stories into iTunes to put them on my mp3 players. I just had to stick the cd into my home computer (school one doesn't have iTunes) and the computer figured out that it needed to import it there. It was automatic.

    As for having grades, my class still has reading tests on Fridays. When you are first launching it, you are adding a little at a time, so you have other time in your day to get everything done. We start off with read to self, add stamina, and after a week (or less for me last year), teach another portion. I had a specific time of day that I just practiced the stamina and made the anchor charts. When we got through all the steps we focused on different areas during the time blocks (altogether) until I thought they were ready to be set free to make their own choices.

    Hope this helps.

    Emily
    www.ilovemyclassroom.blogspot.com

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  74. I'm very interested in using this method in my classroom this year. I don't have the books but can download them on my KIndle app. and get caught up really quick. My questions would be will the electronic version of these books be just as good as the print? Are there pages that I would need to photocopy from the print version that I wouldn't be able to print from the electronic version, or can you print from the electronic version?

    carrollbaskets@yahoo.com

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  75. I'm very excited to wrap my head around this program with so many others this summer. I read the CAFE book last year, but not Daily Five as I had heard it was "too primary!"

    My biggest issue is going to be schedule with a secondary issue that I have a required spelling text to use. We have a reading basal and a language text, but I have more freedom with those.

    I am in a mostly self-contained 5th grade at a parochial school. We swap for science and social studies, so that is one time of day that is set. I will only have one day a week (Weds) where I could do a true Daily Five schedule (2 1/2 hours). The other four days vary. Monday I have two separate 40 minute times, Tuesday only 60 minutes total, Thursday only 30 minutes total, and Friday 75 minutes.

    Here are some of my thoughts/coping strategies for next year:
    Monday - make one block reading, one block writing
    Tuesday - correct required spelling, then grammar skill, then read or write
    Wednesday - take required spelling test, then incorporate reading, grammar, writing w/ mini lessons - try to do most conferencing here?
    Thursday - grammar skill, use whole group band time as read to self & conferences for non-band students?
    Friday - reading and writing

    Does anyone use class read alouds for listen to reading? I usually read a book while they eat a snack - I could incorporate some skills and writing using the read aloud book.

    Has anyone used this with whole class novels? I have LOTS of whole class sets and would like to still use a few of them.

    Any thoughts on incorporating Time for Kids or Scholastic News?

    Grading could also be an issue - I look forward to some good ideas from all of you!

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  76. I teach 6th grade, all subjects. That is new to me. Previously I only taught math and science so for the past three years I have been looking for the "best practice" to teaching the language arts block.

    I was excited when I read the introduction because the sisters talked about busy work and the need to rethink the tasks we ask our students to perform. I stand behind my philosophies as a teacher and for a long time have been throwing out tasks that would not make a difference in student learning. Book projects were a big one, packets the students were to complete while reading an assigned novel were another. I am thrilled to see more and more teachers move toward student choice and tasks that make a difference in their literary growth.


    My current time for teaching literacy will need to be tweaked. Because I am in a self contained class with pull-outs for Title 1 and LD I will have to work around them and hope that I can arrange an uninterrupted 90 minute block of time.

    I would like to keep all components of Daily 5. However, the ones that will make the cut will be read to self, work on writing and word work. I still have a lot of thinking to do about how all of it fits together in my classroom. I am excited to learn more from this group and share when I can. It looks as though several of you have already had some experience with Daily 5. I am brand new to the idea so I am thankful so many of you are out there to share with.

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  77. I integrated my version of the Daily 5 in my 4th grade class this current year. It was a Daily 5 tech version! My Daily 5 included 6 centers to accompany by 30+ students.They went to 2 centers a day, and they completed them all by Wednesday. Each center lasted about 20 minutes which is shorter than the amount of time the sisters allot to the Daily 5. This year I am teaching SS along with all components of ELA. I definitely can not lose time from my Daily 5. Still trying to plan how I can integrate SS within ELA and cover all the required GLEs.

    The most essential parts of the Daily 5 in my classroom are the Listen to Reading center combined with the Read to Self. Students are given a choice to read to self or use an iPod with the audio version of the chapter book we are reading. The other is the Work on Writing which I have two centers of with one consisting of students writing a post on their blog via Kidblog and the other students creating a Genius Paragraph using Keynote on the iPads. I plan to keep all of my centers and just tweek one with adding a SS component to integrating the Reading skill of the week.

    www.ericashep.blogspot.com

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  78. This will be my 4th year teaching 4th grade...previously I taught 1st grade for 4 years. I use(d) Daily 5 with both levels. For first grade I followed the Sisters rollout schedule to the letter. In 4th grade we move a little faster but practice is KEY to success.

    I use my basal for the mini lessons and we have a few days that more time is spent whole group than others. This is when the main basal story is read.

    I have read both books several times and I am looking forward to focusing on the upper elementary issues that I've been trying to solve myself. I am looking forward to discussing the Reader's Response Notebook!!!

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  79. As with several others, time is a factor. (In the past our class schedules have been made for us pretty much.) I am also concerned about taking grades. Maybe as we get into the nuts and bolts of Daily 5 some of these issues will be addressed.

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  80. @Emily, thanks so much for sharing your schedule. It helps to have a framework to look at when planning out my own schedule. I often feel I am on opposite ends of the spectrum by putting in to little or packing in too much.

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  81. As an avid reader who loves books, I have always struggled with teaching to the test & being bound by a text book. The struggle is there because I know that worksheets and textbooks don't make better readers...Actual Reading does. I have taught 3rd grade for 4 years and nxt school yr will be my 2nd yr teaching 4th Grade. I have been devouring books and resources about the workshop methods and have even implemented some aspects of them in the classroom this last year. I am excited about this book study & look forward to learning more about D5 & what it looks like in the classroom. Based on what I have read so far the Sisters are spot on. As with many other posts I too am concerned about time constraints, district curriculum/pacing guides, and grades. I don't look at these things as road blocks, but am looking to see how to implement D5 while incorporating these things. Thanks for this awesome opportunity to discuss as a community of educators/learners :-)

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  82. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  83. I teach third grade, and will be going back to self contained this year. Many of you have thrown ideas out there that have somewhat answered my looming question: "How do you fit that entire rotation block in with 90 minutes of reading instruction?" At my campus, we don't necessarily have a REQUIRED amount of time or block to teach, since some of us are partnered and some are not know. I think reducing the number of student independent work times might work very well, possibly two-three. Although the sisters have established many of the things that I am currently feeling (endless grading, busy work busy work busy work), I'm nervous that only allowing them these two rotations won't be enough! Has anyone else already done this in a self contained classroom in 3-5? Looking forward to easing my anxiety in the next chapters!

    Mallory
    www.msgingrade3.blogspot.com

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  84. @Angela
    I am reading Daily 5 on my iPad, all charts can be opened online and printed from there.

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  85. For the past 10 years, I've taught a 3rd grade Inclusion classroom. This year I had a very challenging group of students due to their various needs and levels. This class taught me a tremendous amount about myself as a teacher, one thing being I needed to revamp my way of approaching reading. So, this summer I have been searching for a practice to implement. I look forward to implementing the Daily 3 in my classroom next year as I loop to 4th grade with my students.

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  86. I have just awarded you the One Lovely Blog Award!

    Stop by to claim your award.

    Patti
    On The Road To Success

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  87. I found this site that has 60 and 90 minute schedule rotations:
    http://k-5literacyconnections.weebly.com/daily-5.html

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  88. I teach third grade ELA and SS in Texas. The district curriculum is very fast paced. I had varied levels last year including 10 ESL students. I feel that the students made progress but not what I'd expect. I attempted Daily 5 and then abandoned it because of the lack of structure. However, this year, I'm going to try it again (probably Daily 2 or three) and spread the rotations throughout the week. I also have the challenge of finding some type of rotation schedule for the 30 minutes of SS that needs to be taught. In addition, there is a big push for Genre Study. So, I will daily, have read to self, writing, word/vocab/grammar. There will be some non negotiable activities and then some of the self selection will occur.

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  89. I want to start using the Daily 5 in September. I'm a little nervous. One of my concerns is the time spent on establishing routines. Does it really take 6 weeks?

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  90. This is very intriguing but I teach middle school language arts. That means I have a 45 min block each day for grades 6, 7, and 8. In that time I have to teach Literature and writing. Not sure this will work for me. Any thoughts? Please?

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  91. I moved from 2nd grade to 3rd grade and from one way dual Language to two way dual languaje. Which basically means I will be teaching reading and writing to 3 groups any given day in spanish. I have being translating the whole month of June. I'm worry about the time, but Im totally doing it. Someone talked about Word Work and words their way, and I completely agree I think it's a perfect match. If anybody teaches more than 1 group a day and can give an idea of how the schedule works I will really appreciated.

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  92. After reading the first chapter of The Daily 5 I was hooked. I could relate to all of the issues the sisters were talking about: "We spent too much time managing their behavior, planning activities, and putting out fires instead of teaching. We didn't have time to plan for excellent instruction that would meet our children's needs, nor did we have enough time for small groups or individual conferences. We knew there had to be a better way." (Boushey & Moser p. 5). I implemented the Daily 5 in my classroom last year and after the first month I wondered what took me so long! Here are some of my thoughts: The Frugal Teacher

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  93. I am a 4th Grade Math and Science teacher, but I am getting my Masters in Reading Education. My school is implementing Daily 5 and I am very interested in learning a lot about how to run a good reading program where students actually learn and grow on their own levels. After reading the introduction, I was taken back to my days of being self-contained and giving my students cute activities to keep them busy or to enhance the reading story. But did the activities really help them learn anything? I don't think so. I love the idea of Daily 5 and can't wait to incorporate it into my own classroom. One of the main things I am interested in is learning how to get the students firmly established in the Daily 5 routine so that it runs like the sisters described in the book.

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  94. I'm excited to give The Daily 5 a go this year. It will be my first year in 4th grade. I will have around 65 4th graders departmentalized into 3 classes. Last year, my county adopted Lucy Calkins' reading workshop in 3rd grade and plan to move it to 4th grade this year. I like parts of both of the methods and hope to find a balance. Does anyone else here use Lucy Calkins' reading workshop?

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  95. OK, I know this sounds crazy, but I only have 7 kids pre-enrolled in my 1st grade classroom next year. (No, this is not normal.) I am trying to decide if I should even try implementing the Daily 5 this year or wait for the bigger classroom next year. ?????? I no the kids are going to get a lot of attention no matter what I do.

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  96. @Kelly
    I use the Lucy Calkins writing. I think it will still work for it.

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  97. Does anyone use Reading Street with this?

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  98. My district uses Reading Street. Second grade is continuing with the basal, but fourth grade is not; third grade is undecided as of now. We have about 90mi it's available for literacy with additional 30 min for English. Our plan is to do work on writing during the english block and have student choose from the other four during the 90 mi urea we have. They MUST read to self everyday, and do the other 3 at least once a week. We find they tend to choose their favorite and do the least favorite once a week. We are changing our grade from letter grade to a standard/benchmark grading system in reading this year. Our grades will be entered to show growth...not 100% sure what this will look like, but we are working on it!

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  99. I will be teaching 4th grade next year and I'm looping with my children. I want to do Daily 5 because I want to let the kids know who independent and different they have to be when they go to 4th grade. I want them to see that I really want them to be in charge of their own learning. I'm so happy that I have this opportunity to learn from other teachers. Thank you everybody for sharing.

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  100. I teach 4th grade and I am working on implementing reading workshop method in my class. My principal purchased Lucy Calkins reading workshop curriculum. Does anyone use these together? I'm concerned about grades. I teach in a private school and having enough grades is a big. Does anyone have any suggestions on where to begin? I also have Laura Candlers power reading workshop and love it as well.

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  101. I started using my version of Daily 5 two years ago. I have just started reading the book but was exposed to the structure during a professional growth course. It does take a lot of practice at the beginning, (as well as periodically throughout the year lol), but it is well worth taking the time. I had three rotations, read to self, tech time, and work with teacher (told you it was my own version lol), which would last about 20 minutes. We also had a small chunk of time at the end of the day where my kids did word work. My school had mini-notes in the 3rd-5th grade classrooms so tech time was easy to implement. During this time, the students would practice skills on my website, blog, listen to reading, etc. This system worked for me with our limited amount of ELA time. Ideally I would have loved to do much more.

    I am excited to continue to read the book so I can add to the experiences I already have and come up with something even better for the years to come. I will be a Teaching and Learning Coach for my district next year which is a position similar to an instructional coach. I enjoyed reading all of your ideas and look forward to sharing some with the teachers I will be working with.

    @ Melinda- A blog is an excellent way to have the students respond to their reading. My students loved it and it was a great assessment tool also. Make sure in the beginning to stress the difference between social networking (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) and a classroom blog. I also stressed the importance of writing properly vs texting.
    @Mrs. K- We used Words Their Way last year and it was very easy to incorporate it into my structure. I would do it again if I had the choice.
    @Amanda- My previous school was very much a basal school. I originally came from a district that used workshops and it was quite a shock to move to a new district that used a basal. At first, I used the textbook in my mini-lessons and read alouds. It was a good way to merge the two. My school wasn't super strict at enforcing the usage of it, so I eventually weeded all components out and went back to my roots, Balanced Literacy. If one of the other resources you're talking about is the workbooks, that is a very good question. I have a very strong dislike for the ones my district used. I guess you could create your own rotation for something like that.

    I share a blog with a friend and we are following this book study, so check it out for more reflections. http://4321teach.blogspot.com/

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  102. I am teaching two reading sections with 85 minutes allotted for each. I will also teach my own math and writing. I am excited about the possibilities the D5 and Cafe bring. Our ISD/County is offering a two day in-service in August on implementing the D5 and Cafe. I was on a waiting list, but they just added a third session. SO excited.
    I can see how to fit a Daily 3 or 4 into the schedule. I use my iPads and audiobooks for my kids already. I have a lot of work ahead. I want to do the same thing with both classes, but not sure I will have the support I need to achieve my vision. I worry that I will have a group like my last group. It was a struggle. I am also to teach review skills for the first 4 weeks. We take the MEAP test in October. We are to follow a scripted review.

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  103. I am going into my 3rd year of teaching 4th grade. We use the Treasures basal. I too, despise the worksheets, worksheets, worksheets. My first year I stuck to things pretty closely. Last year, I ditched some of the busy work. Next year I want EVERYTHING my kids do to be meaningful. I have spoken with my principal about my lack of confidence with small group reading instruction/organization. In fact, she loaned me The Daily 5 and The CAFE Book. I am really happy about stumbling accross this book study (Pinterest is amazing). Although I am a bit overwhemled with the 103 comments, I know I will learn a lot and walk away with many great ideas. I'm sure things will start coming together the more I read. I usually have 40 minutes of whole group time and 50 minutes of small group time. My IEP students often vary in needs (as I'm sure you've experienced). Some students might be pulled during small groups, while others are pulled the entire reading block. Do you have any suggestions for how to adopt the Daily 5 structure with these obstacles?

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  104. I teach a self contained 4th grade and have done a modified d5/RW for the past 2 years and it was the best change I ever made. Our district uses a basal and a few core lit books, and I am the ONLY one at my school doing this! I wish more would join me. i focus on read to self, writing, word wok (use Angela Bunyi word stems), and I read aloud to kids daily (listen to reading)
    Schedule- mine changes every year due to pull outs- dont let that stop you! I like to break my read aloud from my reading block anyways, since we have so much discussion. I can then do a minilesson during reading block.
    Also- give yourself 4-6 weeks to set the stage-kids totally buy into d5 model if YOU tell/share how much you love to read. I use combo of fountas pinnel (1st 30 days of rw) and aimee buckners ideas. Also, it's important to note that your routine in October may not/should not look the same as May-intro lit circles to keep it fresh!
    Questions/things to review-easy way to collect grades- weekly letters were so time consuming with 30 kids.
    How to incorporate technology- blogs, glogster, gradescan (just learned about this today!)

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  105. I would like to talk to someone who has implemented Daily 5 with their mandated curicculm. We are using Treasures and I am trying to see how this can all work together.

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  106. I really like what I've read so far. I teach 3rd grade ELA and Social Studies. I certainly do not have the 2+ hours talked about in the book. I will hopefully get 75 min in a block per day. I will have 2 classes of ELA and 1 of SS, which will be a 30-45 min block each day. So, I was thinking about having the kids do the Daily 5 every 2 days or so, but really like what some of the other posters have said about having a "daily 3". I just want to do the program justice. I don't want to cut something critical.
    www.ladeebuglanding.blogspot.com

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  107. I teacher 5th grade in Georgia. I began using Daily 5 and Cafe' in December of 2011 and fell in love with the program. I have "tweaked" and played with scheduling and timing, and will probably continue to do so, but truly love what both have done for me and my students.

    I agree with Nicole @ teaching, stitching, parenting: for the upper grades, it comes together when you implement both Daily 5 and Cafe.

    I have 90 minutes for spelling/language/reading/writing and it is not nearly enough. It can work--but sometimes I feel I rush my students.

    I use the Daily 3--Word work, work on writing and read to self--in that order, but the times always vary. Monday's Word Work is much longer than any other time as I introduce the lesson that day. Writing may be extended...but read to self is ALWAYS the last 20 minutes of the block.

    A lot of comments mention grading. That was a great worry--but that ended up being the least of my worries. Grading became creative...rubrics were added and the good ole' paper and pencil worksheets ---if they were really helpful and honed in on standards--were kept.

    I feel this is still a work in progress!!!

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  108. Both of these great books have been sitting in my "to be read" pile for over three summers...now's the time to drag them out! Love where you are coming from and really appreciate your line of thinking. As a 3-6th grade teacher, I'm going to say that NOT using the "listening to reading" component is a huge mistake! All kids need to fine-tune their listening skills and, as a rule, most children's listening fluency is about 2-3 grade levels higher than their reading fluency. That being said, having students listen to great literature at their listening proficiency is vital to growing readers. This is where I get to introduce kids to amazing authors and really stretch my readers!

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  109. Wow...so many great ideas and food for thought! My mind is spinning! I read both books and also Laura Candler's Empowering Readers and did some implementation in my 4th grade, tweaking them to make them work in my classroom. I especially focused on Read to Self and mini lessons with literacy work stations interspersed along with small group sometimes based on reading level, other times based on skills. Didn't feel like I did a very good job on the writing and that is definitely an area I want to work on this year. I will be moving to 3rd grade this year and will be teaching 2 classes of ELA and SS. I am definitely looking at how to integrate SS with the ELA in a 2 hour time frame. I will say I was very pleased with the scores of my students on the OAA (Ohio Achievement)and I will be anxious to see how it works this year. I hate to make judgment on just one year's worth of data. But I am pleased and will be continuing it this year.

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  110. I taught kindergarten for 10years, but moved to 6th grade ELA last year. We have 86 minute blocks which is really only about 80 most days. How do you implement the daily 5 & meet common core standards in the time constraints for 6th? Any suggestions are appreciated.

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  111. I teach 4th grade reading/writing to 3 sections of students. I am lucky to have an hour with each class. I used Daily 5 last year and my kids LOVED it! We did take the time at the beginning of the year to learn the procedures and that was hard for me. I felt like we were wasting so much precious learning time, but it really paid off. By mid October we were completely independent and our days were consistent and smooth sailing.

    I turned the Daily 5 into the Daily 4 in our room, and had to incorporate our district curriculum. Here's how I broke it down:

    Monday: We introduced the focus skill, vocabulary, and story in our basal reader. Unfortunately for some of my struggling readers this was carried over to the next day as their read to self activity....it's always about the time and the requirements. They didn't seem to mind though.

    Tuesday: I introduced the work on writing and read to someone activities and we (quickly)reviewed the focus skill. The students complete read to self daily and then either read to someone (I used the leveled readers that came with our series and had questions for them to answer (lots of times it was verbal....I wanted them talking about their reading), word work (they use the vocabulary we learned on Monday), work on writing (varied from week to week), and then guided reading with me. I used this time to review our focus skill for the week and with my struggling readers we reread the leveled reader that had completed with read to someone.

    Wed.-Fri. this routine continued through out the week. I would usually do a short grammar lesson on Wed. before we began Daily 4, and on Thursday we would do another whole class lesson on the focus skill, and then on Friday I would allow them time to finish any work from the week. Many times they needed a little extra time to complete a word work activity or their writing activity. This work time gave me time to meet with kids 1x1 to review the weeks focus skill, give individualized writing instruction, or listen to my struggling readers do a bit more reading.

    Last year I only had 2 sections and we had 90 minutes (which was ideal), so I'm not sure how I will get it all in this year with only an hour block. We are trying VERY hard to work out our schedules so that we can get 90 minutes.

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  112. I am moving to 3rd grade after teaching Kindergarten for the past 8 years. In the last few years, I have felt what the sisters were talking about in the beginning with "constantly putting out fires and busy cute work." I never felt like the students were "getting" as much as they should. My end of they year assessments proved that they were making improvements, but I felt like they could have gone much further. I was also fed up with spending so much time getting ready for the next day or week.

    Now that I am moving to third, I have to look at things from a whole new perspective. I am excited to be a part of this book study and learn so many things from varied levels of D5 expertise. I will also be attending a 2-day conference next week that will discuss the D5 in regards to a 90-minute reading block. I hope this will allow me to share some more information as well.

    @Jackie - You mentioned using the IPods for reading fluently and that you would listen to them later. Would you mind explaining how this works a little further?

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  113. @murfmom, This year will be my first trying Daily 5, but CLassDojo has been a big hit in my classroom. It is awesome because it chimes when they get a positive point or makes a low sound when they get a negative. You can control it from a smartphone or iPad so I still use it when we are at assemblies or transitioning in the hallways. All it takes is that one little sound to get the kids back on track. I show them their points frequently throughout the day. At the end of the week, they can earn 100 tickets for each DojoPoint which they trade in for things like sitting in the rolling chair to free iPad time. I am thinking this will be very easy to incorporate with the Daily 5 structure since I can keep their points projected during the session and add or deduct points without disrupting the entire lesson.

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  114. I teach 5th/6th grade reading, writing, and social studies at an international school in Nagoya, Japan. So throw in all of the difficulties "normal" teachers face along with having my entire class be ESL, yet still needing to teach "normal" curriculum with no support or budget for all the "extras". Last year was a struggle to motivate my low-level class to be excited about learning and increase comprehension levels. I only have about 45 min for each class, so my literacy block is non-existent, something I would like to change for the coming year.
    I do think that finding more time for the students to read to each other is important, it does help develop fluency and improves their confidence levels. I like the part of the Daily 5 that allows for a short mini-lesson and then time for the students to apply it and the teacher to assess in small groups.

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  115. This is many "firsts" for me! I am blogging for the first time, reading Daily 5, and hopefully using the ideas of D5 in my classroom. It has really helped me to see how this method can me used in my fourth grade classroom from reading what everyone has said. There is no way I can do the D5 everyday for 90 minutes!! I'm seeing more of a D3 or 4 with read to self every day. I also found a lot of useful print outs for the classroom from The Wise Guys on TPT!! Looking forward to hearing what everyone has to say, and to see if I'm doing this right!! (Blogging!!)

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  116. Wow! I'm so excited to see the fabulous conversations going on!!

    I'm starting to see a pattern... that many intermediate teachers find a Daily 2/3/4 more workable that Daily 5.

    Would you let your students choose from the 5 choices The Sisters created or would you narrow their options by eliminating something?

    Our school subscribes to BookFlix and PebbleGo - two sites my 3rd graders still love. I'm thinking this is how they could access Listen to Reading. I've also thought about working our Words Their Way time into Word Work. Time is definitely an issue for all of us! :)

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  117. I am so excited to read what everyone is saying. My question deals with the larger classes we are all facing. How large is too large for groups? Throughout the week, are you meeting with each student?

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  118. I love all the posts. Can't wait to get started. This first year using D5 will be an eperimental year for me. Time and grades are a concern, but I'll figure it out as I go along. Thanks for all the great ideas. Looking forward to the rest of the month.

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  119. This Daily 5 book is an easy great read! I couldnt only read chapter 1 and stop so I kept reading. I'm very interested and now planning on doing it this school year. I teach 3rd grade self contained classroom. I've done readers and writers workshop for the past 4-5 years. The more expectations though with making sure to get in the balanced literacy the more overwhelmed I feel. Chapter one described me to a T at different points in my teaching. I am also concerned about grades. I agree with rubrics will have to be used, but I'm unsure how??? and on what??? I've read several chapters ahead and havent seen grading mentioned yet.
    Ms. Baker

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  120. I am a third grade teacher and I am really looking forward to implementing the Daily 5 this year. This year will be an experimentation year for me but I a really looking forward to my students doing meaningful activities during reading time instead of busy work!

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  121. I teach 4th grade and implemented D5 last year. I loved it and the kids loved it! Things I need to tweak for next year:

    * use the language more!
    * reteach behavior expectations before/after having a sub.
    * use more technology! (I have purchased some MP3 players for listen to reading and am trying to raise $ for tablets through DonorsChoose.org)
    * possibly require Read to self???? I have heard of other teachers doing this.

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  122. I teach a self- contained 5th grade class in Alabama. I have 90 minutes for reading and 80 minutes for writing. My writing block is interrupted by lunch, so I'm thinking I can do some writing instruction before lunch, then come back and begin my D5, flowing right into my reading block. I do not know if I can incorporate all 5 every day, but I'm liking the idea of maybe doing 2-3 must do's and 1 can do every day, with all 5 being touched by the end of the week. I can use the focus lessons to teach the reading skills/strategies, with small group time to offer more support to those who need it, while those who don't continue to enjoy their choices.

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  123. @clittle - I am self contained.

    I haven't thought about the grades, but I see this as the way to manage my small group instruction. I would still administer my assessments whole class, and through small group or one-on-one. I see my mini-lessons as my whole group instruction time. Then using the daily 5 for the student independent/small group time.

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  124. Delightfuldaily5cafe.blogspot
    I strarted reading D5 on my Kindle Fire for only $9.99! I found the above blot dedicated to D5. It has helped me along through my reading journey of the D5. Going to implement in 3rd grade.

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  125. 5th grade teacher here. I am super excited to be apart of this book study. I agree with everyone who has mentioned time as a constraint. I am hopeful that as I learn more I will see ways to fit everything I deem important into my schedule! Thanks for all the information. I love reading the comments!!

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  126. I am an 8th grade teacher - participating in the book study because so many of the bloggers who I follow are either leaders or participants. I know the basic structure is designed for elementary classrooms, but I am hoping to find ideas and strategies that can be implemented in my upper middle school world. So far, so good! I can't say I understand all the talk about centers and workshops - but I do understand a classroom where I am exhausted at the end and I feel like my students are not progressing as I would have hoped.
    My class period is 70 minutes (on a perfect day) so I see myself doing what many others have already commented. I will likely choose 2-3 must dos each day and use the other 2-3 as will do throughout the week. This way all five are done in one calendar week but only a few are focused on each day.
    If there are any other middle school teachers who have used this program or are planning to, I would love to talk to you. :)

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  127. @Abby- I have always given the rotations to the students and assigned groups for each rotation. I loved the idea of giving the choice to them and holding them responsible. I also like the idea of having them choose which one. Certain students might need more of one component than another, so it might be a good idea to conference with them regarding this. And of course it will take a lot of practice developing this routine. :)

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  128. I have taught a 4th grade gifted and talented self-contained classroom for the past 2 years, before that I taught 5th grade. I love the idea of D5, but the mini lesson idea has me nervous. How do you get a meaningful lesson/discussion in in 7-10 minutes. I have a 3 hour block in the morning for LA/SS so I'm going to incorporate SS into listen to books. I have my textbook on tape and will download the text onto the iPods I recently received from Donorschoose. I'm just don't see how to get the skills and discussion taught in 10 minutes or less. I also am confused about what to do with the rest of my time while I gradually introduce the routines. Do I do whole group lessons in the areas I am not introducing? With gifted kids routine is very important and if I start teaching one way it's very hard to get them to do something else. I'm looking forward to the discussion here to maybe answer these questions.

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  129. I am a 4th grade teacher. I teach reading/English/writing block. I also teach social studies in the afternoon. I bought this book during the IRA convention this spring and read it on the plane trip home. I can't wait to reread it and figure out how to implement it in my classroom this year. Grades are also a big concern for me. I am required to give the weekly test for our basal series and have to fit that in my day. Any suggestions?

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  130. I have a lot of new things to try this year. I am excited and fearful all at the same time. I have been SS/English for 5th and 6th grade for the past four years and I am going self-contained 5th grade. We are going one to one iPads and expected to use them for a big percentage of our day. I do have freedom with what resources I choose to use in my curriculums as long as I teach to the standards, CC and state. I am just learning about Daily 5/Cafe for the first time, as well. It helps to know I am not the only one out here with questions and concerns. This book study is a great idea. Thanks to all out there who are contributing. Your comments are giving me lots of ideas and information.
    Mrs. Hubbart

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  131. Our district is implementing CAFE this year, but they have not talked as much about D5. I'm looking forward to learning more from both books.

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  132. I am also required to use a basal, Treasures. LUCKILY, we only have to test every other week, which I think will give some flexibility. I pretty much dictated what skills to teach, and as of right now, I'm thinking the first day of each story to skip the HORRIBLE vocabulary intro piece, and use the basal as the text to introduce the skill, create the anchor chart, and then do a Daily Three (Read to Self, Work on Writing, and Work With Words). My time block is really cramped, and I plan on using the leveled readers when the kiddos meet with me. I have been using responses for self selected reading for awhile, so I plan to make my kids answer a prompt of their choosing during their Read to Self time.
    Lisa
    Fourth and Ten
    Like Fourth and Ten on Facebook!
    Formerly Stories From Second

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  133. How exciting to get to be a part of this book club! I will be teaching 4th grade for my second year this year. Last year my students spent a good portion of their time, "reading to self" but I don't think I developed expectations and routines as thoroughly as I should have. I am not sure they were reading "just right" books all the time and know that I spent much more time, "putting out fires" than teaching. I am excited to focus on expectations and routines for the first several weeks so students can be more independent. I plan to have a daily read aloud at some point each day, hopefully with read-aloud notebooks, as mentioned in "On Solid Ground." I will also have a reading mini-lesson and of course writing (and word work). I don't know how to make it all fit. Also, we are required to collect exit tickets each day. Any idea how that would fit in? What about reader's notebooks? I would like them to respond to their reading at least once a week, but also want them to write that is not directly related to their reading. There is so much to think about.

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  134. I'm a fifth grade teacher and I tried using Daily Five a few years ago. I know that I did not spend enough time on practicing expectations and procedures, so I still felt like the behavior police. This is something that I will invest time in this school year, instead of feeling rushed by some curriculum cops to start reading groups and instruction right away.

    I'm also reading "Reading Essentials" by Regie Routman and am finding a lot of connections. In terms of grade, she offers a reading rubric that is quite school. Students evaluate themselves on 10 skills based on a yes or no. 9-10 yeses are an A, 8 a B and so on. She also bases her instruction on individually assessing students, as I would see Daily Five letting me do, and setting individual reading goals.

    @Sandra - I was a National Board candidate this past year (fingers crossed for results in November!). This aligns perfectly with setting goals for our students and teaching to their needs.

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  135. The piece of this section that has stuck with me since I finished the reading is that community leads to self- and peer- monitoring. I love the example of the kid who pointed out the I chart to help a friend get back on track!

    Ahh... if only I had any wall space!

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  136. Two years ago, our school organized and joined with a nearby school. We are now a divided elementary (K-4 in one town and 5-8 in another). I teach in the 5-8 building and teach 5th grade reading and language arts. In the K-4 building they have been doing the Daily 5 and CAFE. I would really like to learn more about these ideas to possibly implement in the upcoming year. I love how much practice is involved in the process, however, after reading that it takes 2+ hours I'm not sure how I can make it work. We have a bell schedule, like a middle school, and I only have a total of 90 minutes with two periods back-to-back. The other issue is that last year we did RTI during my language arts so I lost out on 20 minutes of class time for that too. Hmm...Curious to see what everyone else says. It seems that's an issue for many of you out there. Can we still make this work?

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  137. I used daily five last year in my enrichment class and I definitely loved using it to meet the individual needs of the students. Sometimes I had to bump it to a d3 or d4 because there wasn't much time but I always opened all five. I think d5 makes the students more accountable for their learning.

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  138. I started using the Daily 5 two years ago and the first year jumped in with both feet and really went with it. This past year, my kiddos needed so much whole group instruction and their independent abilities were minimal, to say the least. Read to someone was a diaster.

    That being said, I am moving from 2nd to 4th and will only be teaching literacy. I will be .5 literacy support (small group pull-out) and .5 grade 4 literacy (really more like .4-about 1.5 hours a day)

    I tend to do more of a daily 3 than daily 5 and read to self and work on writing are always manditory. I know that limits the choice aspect somewhat but the 1.5 hours is all I have...no other spot for writer's workshop so this is how I do it.

    I think all components are essential but fitting them all in is somewhat difficult. Fortunately, students get 'listening to reading' on a daily basis during read alouds.

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  139. This will by my first year teaching 5th grade ELA (I have previously taught only Social Studies) and I was looking for a way to structure my ELA block of 90 minutes to make it the most beneficial. I was so excited when I came across the Daily 5 and CAFE books - and this book study. Since my blocks are locked in at 90 minutes with another 30 minutes of split math and reading intervention time, I'm definitely thinking of focusing on three components: Read to Self, Work on Writing, and Word Work. I'm thinking of using the Read to Someone and Listen to Reading as components of my intervention time.

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  140. I am an "intervention specialist" since my district moved to RtI/II 8 years ago(formerly SpEd). I teach ELA and math to 5th and 6th grade students along with Tier 2 interventions in reading and T2/3 in math. This year I will have 2 hours and 20 minutes with 5th grade and 2 hours for 6th grade LA and interventions. I have 60 minutes for math, which has both grade levels at the same time, with 2 separate curriculums and interventions during that hour. I think D5 is the best option for my students so I can reach the broad spectrum of learners in my classes, but I'm struggling to work out the scheduling. My reading interventions run about 40 minutes every day. Math intervention is more flexible. Has anyone done anything like this with D5? I'd like to use D5 for math particularly (this is where my widest spread of skills is) but more and more I'm thinking of LA too. I'd appreciate any and all ideas, suggestions, thoughts. Please feel free to also email me directly: schamberlain@warwicksd.org

    thanks. I love reading all the ideas and am hoping someone can help.

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  141. I'm a 4th grade teacher going into my second year of teaching. My first impression of D5 was that I totally agree with "the Sisters" basic thoughts on reading instruction. I really do believe that kids become better readers and writers by reading and writing! I made it a point last year to give the kids plenty of time to do both, so I love that the kids would be doing both everyday.

    After that thought, I panicked that I do not have nearly enough time to do a full Daily 5. So, I think I would do a Daily 3. I think I'd allow kids to choose from all 5 activities, but set a limit to how many times a week they could go do certain activities. For example, I may say that they can only do Listen to Reading or Read to Others twice a week. The others I'd let them do daily.

    Here are some questions I'm still left with:
    -How do novel studies fit in?
    -My grade level teaches 3 units in writing: personal narrative, persuasive writing, poetry. How can I teach them as part of the Daily 5? It seems like a mini lesson wouldn't be enough time to teach everything.
    -What kind of Word Work would 4th graders be doing? I'm thinking maybe Wordly Wise, but should it also include grammar?

    Bee
    http://beeteaches4.blogspot.com/

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  142. After three years of being a 4th grade math/science teacher, I have requested to be self-contained for the upcoming school year. I am on board with incorporating D5. In the past, I was very active with incorporating Balanced Literacy. With D5, I can see my teaching come even more together! I love to see my students work independently and be responsible for their own progress. Students also respect choices! As I have started to read, I can't help but wonder: How can I get other team members, the ones that tend to be hesitant and negative, to jump on board with the Daily 5?

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  143. To the GEORGIA teachers concerned about the mandated units to teach . . . it is my understanding that these units are not actually mandated, but are actually models for us. They can't mandate them because then they would need to require every class in the state to have the books that the units are written around, and they can't pay for that! They've said several times in the broadcasts that some of the books are out of date or no longer in print or hard to get that were used in the units. They've also said that the units do not need to be taught in the order they've prescribed because they are models. In fact, some of the later units, in my opinion, are better for the beginning of the year than the first unit. I'm using their model to write my own first unit with books that we actually have in our school.

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  144. I am going to be using Daily 5 and CAFE for second time with grade 4 students this year. I agree with previous posts about adapting the format to make it work with your teaching style/time constraints. I usually do 3 rotations and have students choose from the 5 choices, although 1 has to be read to self. They loved listening to reading as my big purchase last year was personal CD players and chapter and storybooks on CD. The big pillows and bleacher seating in the class helped create a comfy reading setting too. The students liked the freedom of choice and I liked the structure and independence it gave students and the way it freed me up to meet with small groups for reading/writing conferences. I have lots to improve upon for this year, especially word work.

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  145. I teach 6th grade reading. I have on average 40 minutes for each class. I would really like to find a way to incorporate the Daily 5 structure in my classroom. I feel that all five of the components are useful and important for the students. I don't teach writing, however students do respond to me through writing about their books. I don't teach spelling, but understanding word origins and how to decode is still important for this age level. Also, I have students who are reading below grade level that would benefit from Listening to Reading.
    Now to fit this all into a 40 minute block is near impossible. I have played around with different schedule ideas. I would like to still incorporate all four focus lessons, I will just have to teach at a slower pace. I think I may do a focus lesson a day followed by work time. With this schedule, my students would only receive one area (comp., rdg. strategy, etc.) a week.

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  146. I am a School/Children's Librarian at a Joint Use Public/School Library. I saw many of the Daily 5 signs and notes around my 3-5th grade classrooms, so I wanted to learn more about it. I am thinking about implemention during my library classes (in the library).

    Has anyone seen it used in this way?

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  147. I have a class set of iPod touches and would like to use them for listening to reading, then they could respond to what they've read on kidblog. The students could blog back and forth and respond to other students thoughts. Has anyone tried this, and how did you like it? Any ideas of where to find good 4-6th grade audiobooks for CHEAP?
    Mrs. Hubbart

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  148. Mrs. Hubbart,
    I use audible.com. With audible I can get two audible credits for $22 a month. Most books only equal one credit and you can store your credits (no use it or lose it). Try it at
    www.audible.com

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  149. I teach 4th grade and am excited to implement Daily 5 as part of my literacy block this coming year. In my district we are required to teach 120 minutes of reading/writing each day. These 120 minutes can be divided as needed, with the expectation to include guided reading, read aloud, spelling, vocabulary, writing, and our district's reading basal. I am excited about the potential to use Daily 5 to incorporate these individual components into one framework. My schedule for using Daily 5 will look different than that of the Sisters' and I may only be doing Daily 3 or 2 depending upon how our instructional blocks unfold. One challenge I'm facing already is scheduling. I will not get a daily schedule until August and then must find time for co-teaching and additional pull-out instructional times for my most at-risk students. Scheduling will likely be my biggest hurdle to overcome when beginning this!

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  150. Hi Everyone,
    I'm so thrilled about how many people are taking part in this book study. I'm currently a supply teacher and am looking for a literacy program that I can put in place when I get a job (hopefully soon:D)
    I’m concerned about the time needed for this program. It says you need 2 hours uninterrupted. I know that our blocks are never 2 hours. I wonder if it will be possible to alter it.

    Please check out my thoughts about this chapter here:
    http://classroomcollective.tumblr.com/post/26438119261/daily5-chapter1 and my website here: http://classroomcollective.tumblr.com

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  151. I am teaching 5th & 6th grade English this year and my biggest concern for implementing the Daily 5 is time. I will have 1 hr with each group of students a day for English and teaching Success For All (a reading program I'm not yet familiar with) to one group of 5th graders each day.

    I do not have 2 hrs to devote to the Daily 5 each day so I'm wondering if I can still incorporate it in smaller segments.

    My issues are:
    Will it be as effective?
    Are their parts I can leave out because they are older?
    Could I split the Daily 5 into two day and still get the same results?

    I'm still reading the book and learning about this method as a whole but just from the introduction I LOVE the thought process behind it!! I want to use it and I'm willing to make adjustments anywhere I can!!

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  152. We are beginning the Daily 5 this year. I have only read chapter 1 so far, but I'm already excited about implementing the full program. I am fortunate enough to work at a school that has a 2.5 hour reading block time. I plan to implement the program fully and am eager to the students at PINEDALE excel in reading!!! Let's GO PANDAS!

    THANKS Ms. Jackson for recommending this book study.

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  153. I am a 7th grade.....math teacher!!!

    I wanted to participate in this book study since so many teacher's talk about it. I wanted to be in the know and see if I could incorporate these practices into my math classroom.

    I have to say that the ideas behind the Daily 5 could work themselves into any classroom at any grade level!

    For that I am a happy camper!!!

    I'll be looking at this book through a different set of eyes each week and can't wait to host Chapter 7 about Putting It All Together.

    I look forward to reading more of your comments are we continue to learn together!!!

    ~Michelle
    Making It As A Middle School Teacher

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  154. I saw the Sisters last fall and they are hilarious!! I loved Daily 5 when I taught first grade! (I could only manage 2-3 rounds.) I just completed my second year teaching third and am working to get my new grade level on board since we group the grade level and switch for reading.

    For sure, I am planning on implementing the format for daily multiplication practice after I discovered my kids LOVED listening and chanting their facts with some youtube multiplication "songs." It really helped some of them! Whereas, some of my students did better after writing 1-3 facts 20 times each.

    The Daily 5 frame allows for differentiation without overwhelming the teacher! :) Hooray!

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  155. Our district is planning to implement a balanced literacy program; using the Harcourt Storytown as a resource. They have provided the Daily 5, Cafe and Words Their Way books for all instructional staff. The "before" description in Chapter 1 describes my classroom perfectly. This is my second read of Daily 5. I am getting so much more from this read. My goal is to actually teach meaningful strategies to the students who need them and help them move forward as a reader and writer. Last year, my class only did the Read To Self. This really got the students engaged in the reading process and interested in what other students were reading. Recommendations flowed between students as did requests to read books when another student finished theirs. Following the schedule for implementation is crucial as the students MUST develop routines at the beginning of the year.

    How to grade during this implementation is a question I have.

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  156. I saw the same reaction from my students when I established "Read to Self" time. I saw an increase in books being checked out of my classroom library. I saw a greater variety of books in student's hands. My students established their own book studies that met before the bell rang....and they were respectful of where others were in the story, or in the series. I was truly amazed by these "repercussions".

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  157. This will be my second year teaching 3rd grade and I'd like to implement the Daily 5 into my literacy block. I've read the book and agree I want my students to do something meaningful while I'm working with small groups. My concern is the management part and how to get grades.

    Here are my questions:
    I have a 90 min literacy block. Which daily 5 components are the most important?

    Also, I do not have a listening center in my room. Are there any creative ways or programs on the computer to help with fluency and listening to someone read?

    Thanks! I look forward to learning more! :)

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  158. This will be my first year actually teaching in fifth grade. However, I was a special education aide for the past year and was able to observe daily five (pure and modified) in kindergarten, second grade, third grade, and fourth grade. I also student taught daily 5 in second and third grade. In second grade, we used daily 5 pretty traditionally. However, we didn't do all five activities every day. Typically we did two rotations and had a full writers workshop. Students had to complete every activity in a week. We had about five word work centers in addition to the regular rotations. They were only allowed to repeat read to self and read to someone in a week.

    In third grade the students were given a reading menu. The entrees were activities the students had to do: read to self every day, complete a word ladder (word work), poetry, etc. Then students had desserts which were optional activities. We taught a mini-lesson (ish) every day, and then students completed the reading menu and writers workshop.

    I'm moving to a new district with my own classroom, and I'm not really sure what the plan is there. I will be teaching language arts, reading and social studies possibly with two or three blocks. If the curriculum cops are strong in my new district, I will probably implement something like the reading menu. However, I'm really interested in how exactly to implement "true" daily five in upper elementary grades. I'm so excited I found this blog!!

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  159. Theresa,

    we used starfall.com and tumblebooks.com in classrooms without reading centers. I also saw teachers use iPads/iPods for digital storytelling. I liked using my iPhone to record students reading aloud. Wow, what a difference 30 seconds of listening to yourself read can make!! The kids loved hearing themselves read and were able to improve quickly. Hope this helps a little!

    Laura

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  160. Lots of people asked about grading...in second grade, we had a behavior rubric for students to follow. We completed one a week for each child that talked about behavior and choice. Results were tallied and scored. In third grade, we graded reading responses, word ladders (for completion), and behavior. Maybe a little more. Finding things to grade actually wasn't too difficult, once you also got into the routine.

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  161. I am a 5th grade language arts and social studies teacher. Like many, I am excited to learn more about the Daily 5 and Cafe. I'd been under the impression that they were only for k-3 teachers, so I really know nothing much about them. I only have about 80 minutes to meet with my groups of language arts kiddos, but this time doesn't include word study time, as that will be taught during another 30 minute block during the day. I am keeping an open mind and not making any decisions about how to schedule everything until I learn more. But I a very excited to embark on this journey!

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  162. I'm going to be teaching 4th grade self contained for the first time after teaching 7th, 6th, and 5th grade the last three years. In looking over my new curriculum, I'm thinking now is the time to also implement Daily 5. I can easily see using my spelling text for word work, and English activities for writing. Listening could include MP3s to hear a classroom novel, read to teacher could use the leveled books and read to self using the basal, but then it looks a lot like my former schedules. How do you incorporate choice when you haven't presented your mini lessons about vocab, writing, etc. yet?

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  163. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  164. I haven't read through all the previous comments yet so I might repeat somebody but I hope not! I teach 5th grade language arts and I only have an hour and an half to teach reading so I am really struggling with how to fit it all in. That is one reason I found this blog. I'm searching the internet for any ideas and adaptations other teachers have made to fit their schedules. I think I am going to have to do a Weekly 3. In the back of the book she suggests doing a Daily 3 with older kids but I can't even get three things in each day. Here's what I'm considering, They will have 10 blocks of Daily time each week. Half of the blocks will be Read to Self. The other five will be split between Read to Others, Word Work and Writing. I have other ideas but this post is getting a little long. :D

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  165. Thanks for all your great thoughts and ideas. This is the first I have heard of the Daily 5. Although read to self has always been an encouraged activity in my classroom it was usually only the fast finishers who had time for it. This is a great way to implement other learning activities and manage the classroom. Giving all learners the chance to learn independently.

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  166. I've been teaching in a very tech-savvy way for the last 7 years, but I just started blogging as a way to showcase a portfolio to get a new job when I move to Colorado in a few weeks.

    Well, I've got my job (5th grade literacy/humanities) and I am joining this book study, because I would ideally like to do Daily 5, but I have no idea what my new position will actually be like.

    I think the Daily 5 could very easily be adapted to whichever components you like/can. For me, the basis is a management principle where students work as independently as possible and the teacher has time for differentiation and assessment. And I could totally see a 'weekly 5' if you wanted to incorporate all elements but have very limited time. When we were part of Reading First, my school really had to strictly adhere to the program/curriculum we had purchased, but had very limited time. We had a 90 minute block for whole-class instruction (which included comprehension, grammar, spelling, and the like) and another hour-long block where we did leveled reading groups and centers. With the kids divided into 4 groups and an instructional assistant to take a group, that left each group with 30 mins. in a leveled group and 30 mins. of center time. Center time was always too much or never enough for me. But I could totally see how I could have given those kids a rotation from the Daily 5 each day (or 2, depending on the group)for their center work. They could finish the whole set in a week, easy.

    Please check out my own comments on my blog.

    P.S. To you teachers with iPads, I spent the last year in a one-to-one laptop classroom of fourth graders. Those iPads sound like the absolutely perfect tools for 'listen to reading/read to someone' or 'read to self.' There are tons of sites where students can listen to someone read a book, (plus, I heartily second audible) and I know my local library has a service where e-books and audiobooks can be checked out and used digitally. You could also have kids record themselves reading a book for a peer to listen to later. Drop by my blog and leave me a comment somewhere if you want more info.

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  167. I am a 4th grade teacher. This will be my second year using the Daily 5 in my classroom. I am looking forward to hearing how others are implementing it in their rooms and using that to further develop it in mine!i, too, appreciate The Sisters mentioning the importance of taking the time to set up routines. Whew, takes the guilt away having that acknowledged. Last year we only spent about a week or so practicing the stamina. It worked out fine probably because the students were older and they were motivated to beat their own time and lengthen their focus. It was incredible. They really policed themselves and enjoyed being able to read without disruption.

    I used all 5 components of Daily 5 in our LA block. During the Listen to Reading component I pulled my small groups for leveled reading using our required basal program. Sometimes we also used the basal story tapes in a listening center here as well. Luckily I had 2 great parent volunteers who also came to help and trained them to run these reading groups when I needed to work with students in Work on Writing or Word Work. I look forward to hearing how others implement the program and I am hoping to be able to learn how to be even more authentic with use of it. (sorry for the typos. I am working from my iPad on a train with sketchy service.)

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  168. It looks like I am not logged in correctly but that last unknown comment was from me. DenniseR. :)

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  169. I just started today, so I will try and get caught up. Last year was my first year to use Daily 5 and I love it! The year before that I started using Laura Candler's Reading Workshop... And I love that also, so when our school k-3 had to incorporate Daily 5 this last year I was bummed at first until I found that they are very much alike and could both be done successfully! I have two classes, one the first half of the day and the other the last half of the day. I teach all of ELA, plus science and social studies. So with that I am busy and have to integrate a lot to get it all in. I still am working on that. Daily 5 has been absolutely help my students in Third grade excell in their reading. Read to Self and Writing is essential. For low readers Listening to Reading is very important!

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  170. I'm glad that I found this blog because I have been trying to implement the Daily 5 and Cafe in my 5th grade classroom for the last couple of years. At least now I can read about some ideas that others have.

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  171. Sandra, I used a modified classroom economy last year with with 5th graders. With Daily 5, rather than relying on your management system, I think the idea is to back up and reteach those procedures if you are haven't lots of off task students. Their stamina may go down but that's okay
    Aubrey

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  172. If you are a departmentalized classroom, I teach 2 third grade classes, how do you create and store book boxes for all of your students?

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  173. Wow, I love reading through all these comments! I am also a 4th grade teacher working on D5 for the second year. I have 90 minute block with one 120 minute block a week. My struggle is how to teach reading and writing all within the same block. I'm thinking about doing a daily 3 then having one of my mini-lessons be about writing.

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